Washington D.C. Personal Injury Laws

Washington D.C. Personal Injury Laws & Statutory Rules

Personal Injury Statute of Limitations

 After You Are Injured

  • Take care of your injuries immediately
  • Contact a lawyer
  • Document all injuries and any damage to property (get copies of accident reports, take pictures, keep receipts and invoices, keep notes of new symptoms, document time off from work, etc.)
  • Get information from witnesses (phone numbers, addresses, statements, etc.)
  • Open a claim with the other person's insurance company
  • Do not give any statements to anyone other than the police before speaking with a lawyer
  • Do not sign any releases of liability or potential claims before speaking with a lawyer

Statute of Limitations

You have a limited amount of time to file your personal injury claim in the District of Columbia. The statute of limitations dictates how long you have to file the claim with the court after you are injured. In some cases, the statute of limitations starts when the person becomes aware of the injury or should have become aware of the injury (the Discovery Rule). Washington, D.C. statute of limitations laws may differ from those of other states.

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS LAWS

Type of Claim: Statute of Limitation:
Negligence (car accidents, slip and fall, toxic torts, etc.) 3 years
Assault or Battery 1 year
Defamation 1 year
Strict Liability 3 years
Products Liability 3 years
Wrongful Death 1 year

 Types of Claims: Who Is Liable?

Negligence

The person or company who was negligent is liable. However, under Washington, D.C. law, if the person who was injured was also negligent, then he or she cannot receive any compensation at all; this is called contributory negligence.

Assault or Battery (Intentional Torts)

The person who deliberately caused the injury is liable.

Defamation

The speaker or writer of the negative statement and anyone who repeats that statement is liable.

Strict Liability

The person or company engaging in the dangerous activity — or who has, in some way, helped to put the product on the market (see below) — is liable. In strict liability cases involving damage caused by an animal, the person or company responsible for the animal is liable.

Products Liability

Anyone who has had a role in putting the product on the market could be liable. Frequently, though not always, this person or company must be someone involved in the sale of the product in the regular course of business.

Wrongful Death

Whoever would be liable for the activity that caused the death is liable.

Damages You May Receive

  • Reimbursement for medical treatment and lost wages
  • Reimbursement for damage to or loss of use of property that occurred as a result of the injury
  • Loss of consortium (loss of services of your spouse: income, companionship, child care, etc.)
  • Money for emotional distress and/or pain and suffering
  • Injury to reputation
  • Punitive damages (money given as punishment)
Alabama Florida Louisiana Nebraska Oklahoma Vermont
Alaska Georgia Maine Nevada Oregon Virginia
Arizona Hawaii Maryland New Hampshire Pennsylvania Washington
Arkansas Idaho Massachusetts New Jersey Rhode Island West Virginia
California Illinois Michigan New Mexico South Carolina Wisconsin
Colorado Indiana Minnesota New York South Dakota Wyoming
Connecticut Iowa Mississippi North Carolina Tennessee
Delaware Kansas Missouri North Dakota Texas
Dist. of Columbia Kentucky Montana Ohio Utah

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Seo wordpress plugin by www.seowizard.org.